Latest news

Our group

Lukasz Pilarski

Principal investigator

Jagadeesh Kalepu

Postdoc

Shengjun Ni

Postdoc

Fredric Ingner

PhD student

Matic Hribersek

PhD student

Swarna Baddigam

Masters student

Oskar Ljungkvist

Bachelor student

You can read more about our group here, including about past members, and how to join us.

Our research in a nutshell

We develop new reactions to make organic molecules in greener, cheaper and faster ways. This can be useful to medicine, in materials science and beyond.

We’re interested in new ‘building block’ molecules useful for making almost any type of organic compound from common starting materials. The idea is to simplify synthesis to the fewest number of steps, minimising cost and environmental impact.

For more details, see our research page and list of publications.

Topics we work on

We have several different projects in the group. Most of them rely on a combination of concepts. Here are some of those we like to work with most.

C-H functionalisation

Organic molecules have many similar C-H bonds that were traditionally considered “unreactive”. We use transition metal catalysts to select specific C-H bonds from an organic molecule and covert them to more useful groups. It’s one of the most direct ways to build up molecules.

Aryne intermediates

Arynes are fantastically versatile but very short-lived molecules. We want to harness their potential for a “building block” approach to organic synthesis in which only a few simple starting materials are needed to make many important molecules quickly.

Mechanochemistry

Many organic reactions need high temperatures and toxic or environmentally harmful solvents. We work on using mechanical force instead, which generates less waste and sometimes reveals new forms of reactivity.

Get in touch

to send stuff

Dr Lukasz Pilarski
BOX 576, Uppsala University
75 123, Uppsala
Sweden

to visit

Husargatan 3, Uppsala

email

lukasz dot pilarski at kemi dot uu dot se

Funding

We thank these generous sponsors who enable us to pursue our research.